Social Sciences

  • Portrait
  • Xian HUANG
  • Research Interests: comparative politics, Chinese politics

Xian Huang is an associate professor in the Political Science Department at Rutgers University. Her research has focused on the politics of social inequality and redistribution in China. She received B.A. and M.A. from Peking University (Beijing, China) in 2006 and 2008, and Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University in 2014. Before joining Rutgers, she was a postdoctoral fellow in the Center for the Study of Contemporary China at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research on Chinese social welfare has appeared in several peer-reviewed journals such as Social Science Research, The China Quarterly, Journal of Contemporary China, and Journal of Chinese Political Science. She is currently working on a book manuscript about the politics and policy of social health insurance in China.

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  • Portrait
  • Yanhong JIN
  • Research Interests: Applied Microeconomics, Industrial Organization, Food Safety, Marketing, Biosecurity, Environmental and Resource Economics

Yanhong Jin is professor in the Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. Her areas of specialization include Applied Microeconomics, Industrial Organization, Food Safety, Marketing, Biosecurity, Environmental and Resource Economics.

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  • Portrait
  • Lei LEI
  • Research Interests: social determinants of health, family dynamics, and social inequality in different societies, including China, India, and the U.S.

Lei Lei is an Assistant Professor of Sociology. She studies social determinants of health, family dynamics, and social inequality in different societies, including China, India, and the U.S. One line of her research seeks to understand how social factors, such as residential context, working conditions, family dynamics, and gender roles, get under the skin to produce and perpetuate health inequalities. Another strand of her research investigates contemporary changes in family behaviors in different societies undergoing social, economic, and demographic transitions. Currently, she employs longitudinal data from the Indian Human Development Survey to analyze how the health of wives and children changes after male out-migration and whether the health effects depend on remittances, duration of migration, and frequency of home visit.

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  • Portrait
  • Carl Pray
  • Research Interests: Science and technology policy with specific interests in biotechnology applied to agriculture, food and biofuels; Food and agricultural policy; Economic development and poverty reduction in developing countries

Carl Pray is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. The focus of his research is agricultural science and technology policy in China, South Asia, Africa and Latin America. Key issues of his research are: How does government research, science policy, intellectual property rights, regulations and advances in basic sciences influence the development and adoption of new agricultural technology? What are the economic and institutional impacts of new agricultural technology – especially its impact on poor farmers in Asia and Africa?

He recently completed a project funded by Templeton Foundation on barriers to the spread of genetically engineered food crops in China, India, and East Africa. He is the Principle Investigator on a USAID funded project on the impact of food policy on countries in Africa and Asia. The results of his research have been published in 75 journal articles including Science, Nature, the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Economic Development and Cultural Change, Research Policy, and elsewhere and in 45 book chapters. Past research was funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, the World Bank, the US Department of Agriculture, and others.

 

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  • Portrait
  • Jesse Rodenbiker
  • Research Interests: environmental governance, urban geography, political ecology, sustainable development, East Asia, China

Jesse Rodenbiker is an assistant teaching professor in the Department of Geography. His research interests are environmental governance, urban geography, political ecology, sustainable development, East Asia, China. He received his Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley, in 2019.

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  • Portrait
  • Louisa Schein
  • Research Interests: Cultural politics, ethnicity, critical race studies, nationalism and transnationalism, diaspora, sexuality and gender, Hmong/Miao people in China and the United States, etc.

Louisa Schein (RCCS Coordinator for Global Programming, 2021-2022) has taught in the Anthropology Department and later in the Women's and Gender Studies Department at Rutgers since 1993. At Rutgers she is also affiliated with the Asian Studies Program, Comparative Literature, Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies, and a is a cofounder of the Minor in Critical Sexuality Studies. She has researched the Hmong/Miao people in China and the United States for almost four decades. She is the author of Minority Rules: The Miao and the Feminine in China's Cultural Politics, an ethnographic study of the cultural politics around the positioning and experiences of the Miao, a southwest minority people, in China’s postsocialist transition. She is the co-editor of two book, Translocal China: Linkages, Identities and the Reimagining of Space and Media, Erotics and Transnational Asia. She is is currently writing a book, Rewind to Home: Hmong Media and Gendered Diaspora, about the production and consumption of grass roots media in the Hmong diaspora. She is also co-founder of the scholarly network Critical Hmong Studies Collective. Schein is co-director of a documentary film on Hmong Americans, Better Places: Hmong of Rhode Island a Generation Later (2011) with Peter O'Neill. Most recently, Schein has collaboratively launched the Chinese-English Keywords Project (CEKP), which involves a multidisciplinary network of scholars concerned with the gaps and incommensurabilities generated when conceptual terms migrate between Chinese and English. The CEKP is in the process of convening a series of panels and workshops in the U.S. and Asia to explore multiple valences and usages revealed in the “social lives” of keywords in both languages, and to prepare a series of volumes themed around particular clusters of terms.

Read more: Schein, Louisa

  • Portrait
  • Bingxiao WU
  • Research Interests: health economics, Chinese economy

Bingxiao Wu is an assistant professor of Economics at Rutgers. She is an applied microeconomist whose research focuses on Health Economics, Industrial Organization and Chinese Economy. In her projects related to Chinese Economy, she studies physician behavior, provider incentives and the design of health insurance system in China.

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